• The United States Football League, as is the case of Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, National Football League and National Hockey League, was initially organized as an unincorporated association.  It would be reorganized as a Delaware non-profit membership corporation in 1985.
  • The league's original offices were located at 99 Park Avenue in New York City.  It would move into permanent office space at 52 Vanderbilt Avenue in 1982.
  • ABC's television contract with the USFL was initially for two years (1983-84).  The network had a unilateral option to extend the contract for two additional, one-year terms; along with an indefinite right of first refusal regarding 1987 and ensuing seasons.  In total, ABC would pay the USFL $20 million over the league's three seasons:  $4 million in 1983, $7 million in 1984, and $9 million in 1985 (though it was supposed to pay $14 million; see below).
  • The ABC television contract stipulated that the network would have a minimum of 26 minutes of in-game commercial inventory to sell with each broadcast.  This did not include pre-game programming nor halftime intermissions.
  • ABC charged $30,000 for each :30 block of commercial time, and projected that games would achieve a 5.0 rating (4.19 million viewers) for 1983.  It would exceed that expectation by a full ratings point.  By the time the league debuted, ABC had already sold $20 million worth of commercial inventory.
  • ESPN's television contract with the USFL was for two years (1983-84).  The then-fledgling cable network held no extension option; a fact that would prove important after the 1984 season, as ESPN and Turner Sports (TBS) would engage in a bidding war for the rights.  Ultimately ESPN would retain the rights, giving the league a three year deal for 1985-87, at a total of $70 million.
  • Of the majority owners of USFL franchises during its three year run, five would end up becoming convicted criminals:  Birmingham Stallions founder Marvin Warner, Los Angeles Express owner J. William Oldenburg, Memphis Showboats founder Logan Young, Jr., Michigan Panthers founder A. Alfred Taubman, and San Antonio Gunslingers owner Clinton Manges.
  • The championship trophy of the United States Football League was manufactured in Spain.
  • The Arizona Wranglers logo and team colors were established by Phoenix artist Robert Brookson.  In all, the team utilized 7 colors in its branding, about double the norm in professional sports at the time.  In 1983 the team would lose its last 10 games (establishing a later-tied record for the longest losing streak in league history), scoring the fewest points in the league (261) while giving up the most (442).
  • The Boston / New Orleans / Portland Breakers were the only team in the history of major professional sports to play home games in different cities in three consecutive years.  In Boston, the franchise made $300,000 in updates to make tiny Nickerson Field suitable for home games; the team lost approximately $1 million there in 1983.  Moving to New Orleans in 1984 and under new ownership, the 1984 version of the team would reportedly lose $5 million.  Moving again to Portland for 1985 in preparation for the league's move to a fall schedule, owner Joseph Canizaro would then reportedly lose at least another $5 million.
  • The name "Chicago Blitz" was submitted in a "Name the Team" contest by Mike Wehrli of Naperville, Illinois, who included along with his suggestion a detailed list of 20 reasons why it should be chosen.  In a poll conducted by the Pittsburgh Press in 1984, the Blitz name was chosen as the "most fierce" among USFL monikers.  When the '84 Blitz were folded by the league, it would trigger a default clause in the USFL's contract with ABC.  Under the deal, the network had required that the league operated franchises in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York at all times.  ABC would ultimately withhold $5 million of its 1985 rights payment as a result.
  • Denver's Mile High Stadium was selected as the site for the inaugural 1983 USFL Championship Game thanks to posting the league's highest attendance figures during the early weeks of the season.  The franchise would be the only one to operate at a profit during any fiscal year in the league's entire history (in 1983).  Perhaps as proof of the adage "what goes up must come down," the Gold experienced the largest drop in average attendance among USFL teams between 1984 and 1985, losing nearly 20,000 fans per game.
  • The Houston Gamblers, which took the field in 1983, technically weren't an "expansion" franchise.  The team had initially existed, on paper, as one held by league founder David Dixon - compensation for his efforts in launching the league.  With singer/actor Kenny "The Gambler" Rogers as a limited partner, the team's name was predictable but nonetheless caused a stir.  When learning of the name the ownership group had chosen, his first reaction was, "Christ, you're kidding."  The team would go on to score a pro football record 618 points in their inaugural, 1984 season.
  • The Jacksonville franchise would conduct a "Name the Team" contest, only to ignore the submissions; team owner Fred Bullard instead opted to name the team for himself rather than choose any of the suggested names.  In 1985, Bullard endeavored to prop up his franchise by attempting to raise $19 million via a public stock offering.  After only 800 people expressed interest in buying a piece of the team at $100 per share (less than the price of a season ticket), he would agree to a merger with Doug Spedding's Denver Gold instead.  The Bulls would lead the USFL in attendance in both seasons of its existence.
  • The Los Angeles Express were the first of two different USFL franchises initially awarded to San Diego, only to never actually play games there.  The only team in pro sports history to be named after a bus, original head coach Hugh Campbell hopped on board after winning an unprecedented five consecutive Grey Cup championships with the CFL's Edmonton Eskimos.  The team would change hands three times during its three year run, ultimately being run as a ward of the league and playing its final home game not at the Los Angeles Coliseum, but at Pierce College.
  • The Memphis Showboats were initially organized by local football booster Logan Young, Jr.  Realizing he lacked adequate capital to operate the team on his own, Young sought (and found) partners to aid him in the effort, chief among them local textile baron William "Billy" Dunavant.  Steve Ehrhart, the USFL's original Director of Administration and commissioner Chet Simmons' right-hand man, was brought on as team president and a minority owner as well.
  • The Michigan Panthers were owned by Detroit area mall magnate A. Alfred Taubman.  With an estimated worth of $400 million in 1982 ($1.03 billion in 2017 dollars), while taking an active interest in truth the team was an expensive toy for him.  Initially he took in a pair of friends as partners (Max Fisher and Peter B. Spivak), and at one point even suggested that Fisher own as much as 50% of the team (he'd ultimately buy in for 20%).  Spivak meanwhile would be elected the "interim chairman" of the league upon its formation in September 1981, serving as the USFL's front man until Chet Simmons would be hired as commissioner on June 14, 1982.  Upon the league's decision to move to a fall schedule, the Panthers would be merged into the Oakland Invaders.
  • In his three years with the New Jersey Generals, Herschel Walker would carry the ball a grand total of 1,143 times, rushing for 5,562 yards and 54 touchdowns.  Walker would also be the USFL's all-time leading scorer:  his 61 touchdowns and pair of two-point conversions resulting in 370 points.  The team could be heard locally on WOR-AM 710 in New York City, where Charley Steiner (later of ESPN fame) did play by play, and Dave Herman and Robert Casciola teamed up on color commentary.  The team's second owner, Donald Trump, would go on to serve as the 45th President of the United States.
  • Oakland Invaders owner Tad Taube was initially unsure as to where the team would play, considering the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Candlestick Park in San Francisco, or potentially even both.  This uncertainty in the early going would lead to a little split personality disorder, with the team referred to in league documents as the "Bay Area Invaders" while it registered trademarks as the "San Francisco Bay Invaders" and "Oakland Invaders."  The "Invaders Radio Network" comprised KGO-AM in San Francisco, KFBK in Sacramento, and KJOY in Stockton, with Joe Starkey, Lee Grosscup and Bob Murphy covering the action.  Quarterback Bobby Hebert waived a $50,000 incentive bonus payment owed him by the Invaders so he could sign an early release from his contract - an entire two weeks before it would have expired anyway.
  • Enfranchised for the 1984 season, the Oklahoma Outlaws would become the second of two USFL franchises initially awarded to San Diego - but which would never play there.  The team's application to use Jack Murphy Stadium, like that of the team that would ultimately become the L.A. Express the year before, would be rejected by the San Diego City Council, on a 4-3 vote.  After its inaugural 1984 season, the team would nearly be merged into the Oakland Invaders for 1985, but differences between Invaders owner Tad Taube and Outlaws general manager William R. Tatham, Jr. about how the franchise would be operated could not be resolved.  The Tathams would ultimately buy the Arizona Wranglers franchise, in effect merging them into the Outlaws.
  • Appearing in all three USFL championship games and winning the last two, the Philadelphia (later Baltimore) Stars would prove the best among the league's 18 teams, posting a 41-12-1 regular season record and losing only the 1983 USFL Championship Game in eight playoff games.  Running back Kelvin Bryant would finish the league's history with the second most rushing yards (4,053) on 855 carries, good for 41 touchdowns along with the 1985 USFL Championship Game's most valuable player award.  Kicker David Trout would rank second all-time among USFL scorers, combining field goals and extra points for 354 points.  The Stars would play in the only tie in USFL history, a 17-17 deadlock against the Oakland Invaders on March 3, 1985.
  • Along with the Pittsburgh Maulers, owner Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr. was the owner of the National Hockey League's Pittsburgh Penguins as well as the Pittsburgh Spirit of the Major Indoor Soccer League.  A "mauler" was a steelworker who forged metals in the mill by using a "maul," a heavy sledgehammer.  Other team nickname finalists included the Flash, Fortress, Pioneers, Points, Renaissance and Vulcans.  While "Flash" wasn't chosen for the team's name, the team's cheerleading squad would be dubbed the "Flashdancers."  The team's logo depicted a muscular steelworker swinging a maul; late in the 1984 season as team losses mounted, some local newspapers poked fun with the design, depicting the Pittsburgh Mauler hitting himself in the head with the maul.
  • Under the terms of the San Antonio Gunslingers Franchise Agreement, owner Clinton Manges was obliged to expand the seating capacity at Alamo Stadium, to 30,000 seats by March 1, 1984, and to 62,000 by March 1, 1986.  The twelve charter franchisees would receive $208,333 from Manges as their shares of the team's expansion proceeds in 1984.  Defaulting on its 1985 franchise fee payment, annual league dues assessments and owing over $450,000 in back pay to its players, the Gunslingers franchise would be revoked on July 19, 1985 - two days after the league would play its final game.
  • The Tampa Bay Bandits name was derived from one of its minority general partners, actor Burt Reynolds.  At the time, Reynolds was the #1 box office attraction in the country, having starred in the "Smokey and the Bandit" franchise.  The Bandits were among the first, if not the first, professional sports franchise to open its own chain of retail merchandise stores, including one in a shopping mall located across the street from the NFL's Buccaneers.
  • The Washington Federals projected an annual loss of a little over $1 million for its inaugural, 1983 season.  In the only way in which the team exceeded expectations, it would actually lose a lot more than that.  Having an agreement in principle to buy the team during the summer of 1984 and relocate it to Miami, Sherwood "Woody" Weiser hired the University of Miami's Howard Schnellenberger as the team's president and head coach.  Meanwhile the league, on Weiser's behalf, had signed a lease for the team to play in Miami's Orange Bowl.